presentation

English 8 students finished up their presentations today. We’ll be using them tomorrow in our discussions we begin tomorrow.

English I students began act four, looking at subtext in the first two scenes.

Homework

  • English 8 Studies: none.
  • English I Honors: 
    • re-read 4.1 and 4.2;
    • complete the study guide for 4.1 and 4.2.

In English I, students finished up act three, looking at subtext in scenes two, three, four, and five. We also finished up the study guide in anticipation of tomorrow’s test on act three.

In English 8, students had a final day of preparation for their effective habits pretensions tomorrow.

Homework

  • English 8 Studies: 
    • work on presentation for tomorrow as necessary;
    • work on the article of the week as necessary.
  • English I Honors: 
    • prepare for tomorrow’s test on act three;
    • turn in the “Decoration Day” paragraphs by tomorrow (will be switching to assessment);
    • work on the article of the week as necessary.

English I students looked at subtext (reading secondary meanings into text) and began examining how it plays out in 3.2, 3.3., 3.4, and 3.5 of Romeo and Juliet. We introduced the idea with Ned Guymon’s “Conversation Piece.”

English 8 students finished up their outlining and worked on their final presentation. We’ll have practice presentations tomorrow before finishing up the unit later this week.

Homework

  • English 8 Studies: 
    • prepare for the presentation later this week;
    • work on the article of the week as necessary.
  • English I Honors: 
    • complete the study guide for act 3 (test Thursday);
    • review the act 2 test analytically;
    • turn in the “Decoration Day” paragraphs at the Moodle site (as necessary);
    • work on the article of the week as necessary.

English Strategies students finished up a test from the other day and began reading the next section of The Glory Field.

English Studies students had a day of final preparation before tomorrow’s mini-project start.

English I Honors students tied up some loose ends before the Beta Club kids head off on their big adventure.

Homework

  • English 8 Strategies: none.
  • English 8 Studies: none.
  • English I Honors: read through chapter 18 by Monday.

First and fourth periods looked at how Romeo is first introduced. They broke into groups to change the words into modern language. They also looked at a modern version of Romeo and Juliet.

Second and seventh periods had their first presentations today. The second groups will go tomorrow in both classes.

Homework

  • English 8 Strategies: groups two, three, and four need to continue preparing for the Anne Frank presentations this week.
  • English I Honors: 
    • Finish the scene one study guide.
    • Read scene two
    • Yelp with joy that your sonnet is done.

First and fifth periods went through their presentations for Mary Todd Lincoln. Students presented their findings and then evaluated other groups’ presentations.

Second and fourth periods worked on sentence types (simple, compound, complex, compound-complex) after going over yesterday’s homework and having a short quiz on chapter two. Notes for the day are available here.

Homework
  • First and fifth periods: the online-writing is due tomorrow.
  • Second and fourth periods:
    • continue working on the Lord of the Flies self-study;
    • read through chapter eight of Great Expectations (by Friday);
    • parse the following sentence in bold (for tomorrow):My sister, Mrs. Joe Gargery, was more than twenty years older than I, and had established a great reputation with herself and the neighbours because she had brought me up “by hand.” Having at that time to find out for myself what the expression meant, and knowing her to have a hard and heavy hand, and to be much in the habit of laying it upon her husband as well as upon me, I supposed that Joe Gargery and I were both brought up by hand.
Parsing Expectations and Final Prep

First and fifth periods had a final day to prepare for their presentations on Mary Todd Lincoln, which will take place tomorrow.

Second and fourth periods went over the homework, which involved an examination of the phrases in this sentence:

To five little stone lozenges, each about a foot and a half long which were arranged in a neat row beside their grave, and were sacred to the memory of five little brothers of mine — who gave up trying to get a living, exceedingly early in that universal struggle — I am indebted for a belief I religiously entertained that they had all been born on their backs with their hands in their trousers- pockets, and had never taken them out in this state of existence.

First we marked some — though not all — of the phrases in this rather long sentence.

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Phrases

Afterward, we took a detailed look at how all of the phrases worked together, how they were related.

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Sentence parsing

Afterward, we returned to Great Expectations and went through the first chapter. Students all agreed that my reading made it easier for them to understand what’s happening in the book. With that in mind, I recommended to students to download an audiobook version if Great Expectations from either iTunes or LibreVox.org.

Homework
  • First and fifth periods: complete the online writing assignment by Thursday. If you’re unable to complete it online, you can do it by hand. The assignment is:

    We make choices every day. Are some choices more important than others?

    Think about the choices you make throughout the day. Some are big; some are small. Some affect your whole day; some affect only the few seconds after you make the choice. Some choices have consequences that build on other consequences; other choices have consequences that seem unconnected to anything else.

    What do you do when you’re faced with a choice? How do you made a decision?

    To answer this question, you’ll be writing three Schaffer model paragraphs that deal with the following:

    • What makes a choice significant/important or insignificant/unimportant?
    • How do you go about making significant choices?
    • How do you go about making insignificant/unimportant choices?
  • Second and fourth periods:
    • Read chapters one and two of Great Expectations;
    • Complete the 6-5-4-3-2-1 on Dickens by
    • Parse the following sentence as we did in class today:

      At such a time I found out for certain, that this bleak place overgrown with nettles was the churchyard; and that Philip Pirrip, late of this parish, and also Georgiana wife of the above, were dead and buried; and that Alexander, Bartholomew, Abraham, Tobias, and Roger, infant children of the aforesaid, were also dead and buried; and that the dark flat wilderness beyond the churchyard, intersected with dykes and mounds and gates, with scattered cattle feeding on it, was the marshes; and that the low leaden line beyond, was the river; and that the distant savage lair from which the wind was rushing, was the sea; and that the small bundle of shivers growing afraid of it all and beginning to cry, was Pip.

First and fifth periods had a final day of preparing their PowerPoint presentations on the commitment of Mary Todd Lincoln.

Second and fourth periods began Great Expectations by looking at phrases before beginning the first bit of the book. Notes on phrases are available here.

Homework
  • First and fifth periods: complete the writing assignment about choice that was at the courses web site (due Thursday).
  • Second and fourth periods: examine the following passage from the opening of Great Expectations. Indicate with parenthesis where each phrase begins and ends.

    To five little stone lozenges, each about a foot and a half long which were arranged in a neat row beside their grave, and were sacred to the memory of five little brothers of mine — who gave up trying to get a living, exceedingly early in that universal struggle — I am indebted for a belief I religiously entertained that they had all been born on their backs with their hands in their trousers- pockets, and had never taken them out in this state of existence.

Research and Reward

First and fifth periods continued with the Mary Todd Lincoln research. We’ll be doing one more day of work on them before we actually present after the break.

Second and fourth periods more or less finished up the unit on To Kill a Mockingbird with a sort of greatest hits of the film. Students will need to make sure they begin reading Lord of the Flies over the break and getting started with the self-study course. (Students who haven’t created an account at the new site will need to do so as well.)

Homework
  • First and fifth periods: none.
  • Second and fourth periods: begin Lord of the Flies and the online work connected to it.

First and fifth periods worked on their presentations about the issue of Mary Todd Lincoln’s sanity.

Second and fourth periods continued with To Kill a Mockingbird<

Homework
  • First and fifth periods: none.
  • Second and fourth periods: continue with the Mockingbird writing assignments (on the Courses site).

First and sixth periods finished up Diary of Anne Frank, acting out the last three pages in class. We’ll do a few more days’ work with the play before moving on.

Second and fourth periods looked at the difficulty of creating a society like the boys in Lord of the Flies are attempting to do. We closed with an examination of how that society is already coming apart at the edges.

Seventh period completed their presentations.

Homework
  • First and sixth period: free-write: are humans inherently good or evil?
  • Second and fourth period:
  • Seventh period: none.

First and sixth periods went over the big scene in Diary of Anne Frank: Van Daan gets caught stealing bread! We also had a bit of vocabulary review.

Second and fourth periods looked briefly at the relationships between the “biguns” and “littleuns” in Lord of the Flies after we completed the first of four vocab quizzes (which will all count as one grade).

Seventh period continued with the Hatchet project presentations.

Homework

First and sixth periods began act two of Diary of Anne Frank. We looked at how various vocabulary words appear in the play, and we examined the motivation of various students.

Second and fourth periods watched a brief claymation version of “The Allegory of the Cave.” I covered the nature of allegory before beginning Lord of the Flies.

Seventh period spent the day working on their presentations, creating their speaking notes and making final corrections.

Homework

 

First and sixth periods finished up the comprehension questions for act one of Diary of Anne Frank and moved on to act two, looking at vocabulary.

Second and fourth periods looked at five principles of sociology as a basis for understanding The Lord of the Flies.

Seventh period spent a final day working on their presentations for Friday.

Homework
  • First and sixth periods:
    • read act two, scene one of Diary of Anne Frank;
    • complete two reader’s journal entries for the scene.
  • Second and fourth periods:

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First, second, and sixth periods completed their research projects/presentations today. They’ll have a chance tonight to earn a little extra credit in order to improve their grades a bit, but otherwise, the heavy lifting for those classes is, by and large, behind us. Of course there is the final exam — I will be posting a short study guide for that later today.

Fourth period continued working on their Victorian England research project.

Homework
  • First, second, and fourth: extra credit for presentation.
  • Fourth period: continue online Lord of the Flies project.