Grading

grades school photo
Photo by Michael Pollak

The district grade weighting requirements for middle school classes and high school classes are different. As such, English I Honors will be a little differently weighted than English Strategies and English Studies.

English I Honors

The grades for English I Honors are broken down as follows:

  • Major assessments: 60%
    • Tests
    • Projects
  • Minor assessments: 40%
    • Homework
    • Classwork
    • Quizzes (Count twice)
English Strategies/English Studies

Grades are divided into major and minor assessments. Major assessments are tests and projects; minor assessments are quizzes, homework, and class participation.

The exact breakdown is as follows:

  • Major assessments: 50%
    • Tests
    • Projects
    • Journal (Starters written daily throughout quarter)
  • Minor assessments: 50%
    • Homework
    • Classwork
    • Participation
    • Quizzes (Count twice)

Projects are comprised primarily of written compositions that undergo revision of some sort or require extensive preparation. Included in this would be book reports, essays, research, and similar.

The participation grade consists primarily of two things: coming to class prepared and being able to conduct oneself in class as an adult. (Please see the rubric for more details.)

The actual grade/percentage breakdown is, as it is school wide, as follows:

A 90-100
B 80-89
C 70-79
D 60-69
F 50-59

Please note that there is a 50-point floor for Greenville County Schools.

Late Work and Missing Assignments

As I teach both eighth-grade and ninth-grade English, I have two policies for late work.

English I Honors

As this is a high school honors class, I expect students to turn in work on time. No exceptions. In other words, I do not accept late work.

Students who miss an assignment due to an excused absence will have five (5) school days to make up the assignment for full credit. After that period has passed, the grade will be entered as “NHI” — “Not handed in.”

English Strategies/English Studies

Students who miss an assignment due to an unexcused absence or who fail to turn in an assignment by its due date will be able to make up the work for reduced credit.

Late work is defined as work that is not turned in by the deadline I provide. This could be the end of a class, or it could be the beginning of a class; it will rarely be “by the end of the day.” When I ask for work, I expect it to be turned in then.

Students who miss an assignment due to an excused absence will have five (5) school days to make up the assignment for full credit. After that period has passed, the grade will be entered as “NHI” — “Not handed in.” Students may makeup that work for partial credit, but as it is late at that point, it is no longer a priority to grade it, and there’s no assurance I will be able to grade it by the end of the quarter. In that case, the student would receive no credit. It’s best, in other words, to turn in work by the due date.

Anyone with questions about the grading system is welcome to contact me.

Power School Codes

In the Power School grade book, I use “NHI” to indicate a student didn’t turn in a particular assignment, “NHI” meaning “Not Handed In.” If the grade is blank, that means I simply haven’t entered grades for that particular assignment. In that case, it doesn’t count toward the grade positively or negatively.

Comments are closed, but trackbacks and pingbacks are open.