poetry

English I Honors students worked with the Joseph Campbell text on the monomyth. We’ll be finishing it up tomorrow.

English 8 students began their final project for the poetry unit.

Homework
  • English 8 Studies: continue working on the article of the week.
  • English I Honors: continue working on the article of the week.

English I Honors students began working on a look at the monomyth (i.e., Joseph Campbell) and how the Odyssey is an example of that. We’ll be finishing up the Odyssey shortly.

English 8 students are nearing the end of their studies of figurative language in poetry. We’ll be finishing up next week.

Homework
  • English 8 Studies: 
    • finish the in-class work on figurative language interpretation;
    • continue working on the article of the week as necessary.
  • English I Honors: 
    • work on the text from class, annotating the text and preparing a Cornell outline of the material;
    • begin reading the next section of the Odyssey;
    • continue working on the article of the week as necessary.

English I Honors worked on mastering the Homeric simile, something that’s initially fairly but deceptively straightforward. Close reading, in other words.

English 8 students had a final day of practice with figurative language. We’ll finish up poetry in the next week or so.

Homework
  • English 8 Studies: complete the article of the week as necessary.
  • English I Honors: 
    • re-read the Cyclops section, finding two ten- to fifteen-line segments that are challenging for comprehension (i.e., either you struggled to understand it the first time you read it, or you still don’t understand it);
    • complete the article of the week as necessary.
Figurative Language Practice and a Seminar

English 8 students had a second day of figurative language practice while finishing up the small poetry analysis assignment we’ve been working on. We went over yesterday’s practice before we got started, and we’ll do the same tomorrow as we get ready for a quiz on Friday.

English I Honors students had a Socratic Seminar/Fishbowl/Think-Group-Share session today about the various visions of Calypso we’ve seen over the last two days.

Homework
  • English 8 Studies: none.
  • English I Honors: re-read last night’s homework, this time looking closely for the Homeric simile that’s located somewhere in the text.

English I Honors students looked at one final version of Calypso, a song by Suzanne Vega:

We’ll be wrapping up Calypso tomorrow with a brief discussion — probably Socratic-seminar-ish.

English 8 students continued with figurative language by having some individual practice after reviewing some group work we recently finished.

Homework
  • English 8 Studies: none.
  • English I Honors: read 372-385 for tomorrow.
Calypso and Solo Interpretation

English I Honors began looking at the question of how various artists using various media over various centuries have re-imagined Calypso.

Westall, Richard, Telemachus Landing on the Isle of Calypso, Glasgow Museums

We looked at the etymology of Calypso’s name:

The etymology of Calypso’s name is from kalypto, meaning “to cover”, “to conceal”, “to hide”, or “to deceive”. According to Etymologicum Magnum her name means kalýptousa to dianooúmenon, i.e. “concealing the knowledge”, which combined with the Homeric epithet dolóessa, meaning subtle or wily, justifies the hermetic character of Calypso and her island. Kalypto is derived from Proto-Indo-European *kel-, making it cognate with the English word ‘hell.’

Then we took a look at two paintings depicting Calypso.

Samuel Palmer, Calypso’s Island, Departure of Ulysses, or Farewell to Calypso, 1848-1849

English 8 students examined a new poem, this time on their own, as we wind down our work on figurative language.

Homework
  • English 8 Studies: none.
  • English I Honors: 
    • re-read the “Calypso” reading you read for homework over the weekend;
    • complete the “think” part of the Think/Pair/Share we are doing for the second image from today (Samuel Palmer, Calypso’s Island, Departure of Ulysses, or Farewell to Calypso, 1848-1849 above)

After building some background knowledge, English I Honors students finally began reading the Odyssey.

Sing in me, Muse, and through me tell the story
of that man skilled in all ways of contending,
the wanderer, harried for years on end,
after he plundered the stronghold
on the proud height of Troy.

We’ll be working on the opening lines for a couple of days before we shift into a slightly higher gear and move through the epic.

English 8 students continued working on group analysis of “The Black Earth.

Homework
  • English 8 Studies: none.
  • English I Honors: 
    • define “appositive”;
    • find two appositives in today’s reading.

English I Honors finished up the background knowledge development for the Odyssey.

English 8 students continued with their group work of poetry analysis.

Figurative Language and Background Knowledge

English 8 students began looking at the EQ “What does figurative language add to a poem?” We did some schaffolded work with figurative language:

English I students looked at an informational text about archaeological studies of the city of Troy in order to build background knowledge for the Odyssey.

Homework
  • English 8 Studies: none.
  • English I Honors: 
    • re-read the text from today;
    • make sure you  have four names, one date, and a few facts about Troy in the “L” section of today’s KWL;
    • look up the words in bold that we worked on determining context clues in class.

English I students had their semester exam. English 8 students continued with poetry in their usual Friday inference work.

Homework

English I Honors students continued working on the Romeo and Juliet project. Since we have an exam Friday, we decided it would be best to spend class time working on the project.

English 8 students had a lightning-fast review of figurative language before we start hitting poetry hard later this week. We need the necessary vocabulary to talk about poetry!

Homework
  • English 8 Studies: none.
  • English I Honors: 
    • study for the semester exam on Friday;
    • work on the project (as necessary).
Metaphors and a Project

English I Honors students continued working on the Romeo and Juliet project. We’ll have a couple of more days’ work in-class this week before the semester exam on Friday.

English 8 students worked on “Because You Asked” from yesterday, with both classes realizing what the poem was about:

Homework
  • English 8 Studies: none.
  • English I Honors: 
    • work on the project;
    • prepare for Friday’s exam.
First Day Back

English I Honors students worked on their Romeo and Juliet projects, which will be due next Thursday (January 12). We also went over the mid-term exam, which is coming up this week. We might be moving it back to Friday due to a scheduling conflict.

English 8 students began their new poetry unit, looking at a poem English I students looked at earlier: “Because You Asked About the Line between Prose and Poetry.”

And the chess club today had a chance to use the new boards and chess clocks that PTSA bought for us.

A great first day back.

Homework
  • English 8 Studies: none.
  • English I Honors: 
    • prepare for the midterm exam;
    • work on the R&J project.

English I Honors students finished their sonnet projects. English 8 students finished the quarter test with the final part of the test on stems.

English I Honors students worked on their sonnet projects. They’ll have one more day tomorrow to finish it up.

English 8 students finished up work on test materials and prepared for tomorrow’s final part of the quarter test, this time on stems.