figurative language

English I Honors students began working on a look at the monomyth (i.e., Joseph Campbell) and how the Odyssey is an example of that. We’ll be finishing up the Odyssey shortly.

English 8 students are nearing the end of their studies of figurative language in poetry. We’ll be finishing up next week.

Homework
  • English 8 Studies: 
    • finish the in-class work on figurative language interpretation;
    • continue working on the article of the week as necessary.
  • English I Honors: 
    • work on the text from class, annotating the text and preparing a Cornell outline of the material;
    • begin reading the next section of the Odyssey;
    • continue working on the article of the week as necessary.
Allusions and Figurative Language

English 8 students continued with poetry and figurative language, working to be able to understand what figurative language adds to a text.

English I Honors students continued with the Odyssey and allusions, specifically allusions in “Wrapped Around Your Finger” by the Police.

Homework
  • English 8 Studies: work on the article of the week.
  • English I Honors: 
    • consider why the speaker is staring at the ring around someone’s finger (in what situations would that happen?);
    • work on the article of the week.

English I Honors worked on mastering the Homeric simile, something that’s initially fairly but deceptively straightforward. Close reading, in other words.

English 8 students had a final day of practice with figurative language. We’ll finish up poetry in the next week or so.

Homework
  • English 8 Studies: complete the article of the week as necessary.
  • English I Honors: 
    • re-read the Cyclops section, finding two ten- to fifteen-line segments that are challenging for comprehension (i.e., either you struggled to understand it the first time you read it, or you still don’t understand it);
    • complete the article of the week as necessary.
Figurative Language Practice and a Seminar

English 8 students had a second day of figurative language practice while finishing up the small poetry analysis assignment we’ve been working on. We went over yesterday’s practice before we got started, and we’ll do the same tomorrow as we get ready for a quiz on Friday.

English I Honors students had a Socratic Seminar/Fishbowl/Think-Group-Share session today about the various visions of Calypso we’ve seen over the last two days.

Homework
  • English 8 Studies: none.
  • English I Honors: re-read last night’s homework, this time looking closely for the Homeric simile that’s located somewhere in the text.

English I Honors students looked at one final version of Calypso, a song by Suzanne Vega:

We’ll be wrapping up Calypso tomorrow with a brief discussion — probably Socratic-seminar-ish.

English 8 students continued with figurative language by having some individual practice after reviewing some group work we recently finished.

Homework
  • English 8 Studies: none.
  • English I Honors: read 372-385 for tomorrow.
Calypso and Solo Interpretation

English I Honors began looking at the question of how various artists using various media over various centuries have re-imagined Calypso.

Westall, Richard, Telemachus Landing on the Isle of Calypso, Glasgow Museums

We looked at the etymology of Calypso’s name:

The etymology of Calypso’s name is from kalypto, meaning “to cover”, “to conceal”, “to hide”, or “to deceive”. According to Etymologicum Magnum her name means kalýptousa to dianooúmenon, i.e. “concealing the knowledge”, which combined with the Homeric epithet dolóessa, meaning subtle or wily, justifies the hermetic character of Calypso and her island. Kalypto is derived from Proto-Indo-European *kel-, making it cognate with the English word ‘hell.’

Then we took a look at two paintings depicting Calypso.

Samuel Palmer, Calypso’s Island, Departure of Ulysses, or Farewell to Calypso, 1848-1849

English 8 students examined a new poem, this time on their own, as we wind down our work on figurative language.

Homework
  • English 8 Studies: none.
  • English I Honors: 
    • re-read the “Calypso” reading you read for homework over the weekend;
    • complete the “think” part of the Think/Pair/Share we are doing for the second image from today (Samuel Palmer, Calypso’s Island, Departure of Ulysses, or Farewell to Calypso, 1848-1849 above)
Figurative Language and Background Knowledge

English 8 students began looking at the EQ “What does figurative language add to a poem?” We did some schaffolded work with figurative language:

English I students looked at an informational text about archaeological studies of the city of Troy in order to build background knowledge for the Odyssey.

Homework
  • English 8 Studies: none.
  • English I Honors: 
    • re-read the text from today;
    • make sure you  have four names, one date, and a few facts about Troy in the “L” section of today’s KWL;
    • look up the words in bold that we worked on determining context clues in class.

English 8 students finished up the overview of figurative language and next week will begin working on poems that include figurative language.

English I students had a final day of work on the Romeo and Juliet project.

The midterm exam is tomorrow. Make sure you’re prepared.

Homework
  • English 8 Studies: none.
  • English I Honors: study for tomorrow’s exam.

English I Honors students continued working on the Romeo and Juliet project. Since we have an exam Friday, we decided it would be best to spend class time working on the project.

English 8 students had a lightning-fast review of figurative language before we start hitting poetry hard later this week. We need the necessary vocabulary to talk about poetry!

Homework
  • English 8 Studies: none.
  • English I Honors: 
    • study for the semester exam on Friday;
    • work on the project (as necessary).

English 8 Studies (fifth period) continued working on the first round of their lit circles. We’ll be finishing up tomorrow and debriefing to decide how to change up the groups before moving on to the next section.

English 8 Strategies students (fourth period) finished up some practice with figurative language.

English I Honors students began with cyclops, one of the most famous segments in the Odyssey.

Homework
  • English 8 Strategies: finish your article of the week (due tomorrow).
  • English 8 Studies: 
    • finish your article of the week (due tomorrow);
    • finish reading the 1964 segment of The Glory Field.
  • English I Honors: 
    • finish your article of the week (due tomorrow);
    • continue working on the “Is Odysseus a Hero” work for the new unit;
    • complete the Romeo and Juliet project (due tomorrow).

English 8 Strategies continued with their MAP review, practicing again with some figurative language practice. We’ll finish up tomorrow before having a bit of review for a small test (covering the review material) we’ll be having on Monday.

English 8 Studies had a second day of literature circles. Students discovered the difficulty of working in lit circles when everyone has not done their assigned roles. Hopefully tomorrow will be more successful.

(All English 8 students (fourth and fifth periods) were given missing work reports.)

English I Honors continued with the Odyssey, looking for more evidence regarding whether or not Odysseus is a hero. We’ll be recording our data on a Moodle forum.

Homework
  • English 8 Strategies: 
    • continue working on your article of the week;
    • prepare for test Monday.
  • English 8 Studies: 
    • continue working on your article of the week;
    • read passage decided upon by your group;
    • complete the discussion preparation for tomorrow’s session.
  • English I Honors: 
Figurative Language, Poetry, and Calypso

English I Honors finished up a bit of work on Calypso, looking at two additional renditions and a short informational text about the etymology of her name.

(c) Glasgow Museums; Supplied by The Public Catalogue Foundation
(c) Glasgow Museums; Supplied by The Public Catalogue Foundation

Afterward, students did a bit of comparing too see how different sources provide different insights into the character of Calypso (or “Kalypso” as in our translation).

One version was the Suzanne Vega song “Calypso.”

Eighties gold!

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Sixth period’s notes

Seventh period noticed a few different elements.

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Seventh period’s notes

English 8 Strategies students (fourth period) continued their MAP preparation by having a refresher about figurative language today and getting a little practice with it.

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Fourth period’s work
Homework for fourth
Homework for fourth

English 8 Studies (fifth periods) returned to their lit circles to finish up the poem “Runagate Runagate” before turning back to The Glory Field.

Homework
  • English 8 Strategies: 
    • continue working on the article of the week;
    • complete the figurative language work from today, including the examples of figurative language above.
  • English 8 Studies: 
    • continue working on the article of the week;
    • read the amount decided by our lit circle for tomorrow.
  • English I Honors: 
    • continue working on the article of the week;
    • prepare a 3-5 point list of qualities of Calypso that you can back from two sources from today (and make sure actually to back them within the list, i.e., put some kind of note in parenthesis regarding the source);
    • continue working on the Romeo and Juliet project, due Friday.

English 8 Strategies began the sometimes-tricky art of integrating quotes from a document into one’s own writing. We had an introduction and a bit of practice, but tomorrow, thought it’s Wednesday and we should be working on sentences, we’ll continue it with some more challenging practice.

English I Honors practiced for their oral project which we will begin working on next week. We’ll have the actual presentations in small groups tomorrow.

Creative writing continued with existing projects and one-on-one consultations with me.

Homework
Puns and Tempers

First and fourth periods looked at how and why Shakespeare used questionable humor in his plays. We looked at the first 30 lines to determine how Shakespeare uses puns to create an opening that appealed to the groundlings in the Globe Theater.

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Second and seventh periods continued their examination of Mrs. Van Daan, seeing a whole new side to her character. We did some character description and whittled the adjectives down to three, finding supporting evidence for each afterward.

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Second period
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Seventh period

We’ll be using today’s planning to try our hand again at writing a Schaffer paragraph about the play.

Homework
  • English 8 Strategies: 
    • Students who didn’t turn in the paragraph comparing the diary and scene two from the play need to complete this and turn it in for late partial credit before lunch tomorrow. (Students who fail to do so will do the work during lunch.)
    • Students who didn’t turn in the individual project planning guide need to complete this and turn it in for late partial credit before lunch tomorrow. (Students who fail to do so will do the work during lunch.)
    • All students need to continue working on their project presentation parts. Students will begin presenting on Monday.
  • English I Honors: 
    • finish reading 1.1;
    • begin working on scene-specific questions from study guide;
    • sonnet due date has been moved to Monday.
Rorschach Test and Finishing Act Two

First and fifth continued with “Flowers for Algernon.” We started an informational text about the Rorschach test in an effort to cover standard RI2: “Determine a central idea of a text and analyze its development over the course of the text, including its relationship to supporting ideas; provide an objective summary of the text.”

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Second and fourth periods returned one last time to Friar Laurence’s opening soliloquy, looking at the language tricks homework.

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We also finished scenes four, five, and six, thus completing the second act. We’ll do some tidying up tomorrow before the act quiz on Monday.

Homework
  • First and fifth periods: none.
  • Second and fourth periods: complete questions (excluding number 7) on page 870.