Class Dojo

Mr. Scott uses Class Dojo as his primary classroom management tool. This is not in lieu of the school-wide ROCK card system but as a complement to it. Students will earn recognition and points for positive behaviors which can add up to a positive ROCK card signature at the end of the week. Additionally, students’ negative behaviors will be recorded and can add up to a negative ROCK card signature at the end of the week.

Positive Behaviors

  • Accept Criticism: The student receives constructive criticism positively. This could include the following:
    • “You could have done a better job explaining this part.”
    • “You need to check your spelling.”
  • Accepting “No”: The student asks to do something, and when the teacher says, “No” or “Not now,” the student accepts it respectfully.
  • Asking for help: The student needs assistance with some task and asks the teacher (or in some circumstances, another student) for help.
  • Began starter immediately: The student comes into the classroom, prepares her materials, and begins working on the starter immediately.
  • Creativity: The student shows creativity in solving a problem.
  • Encouraging others: The student offers encouraging words to another student.
  • Enthusiasm: The student shows enthusiasm about what is happening in the class.
  • Finish strong: The student continues working until the teacher instructs the class to pack up its materials.
  • Focused: The student has remained focused for a long period of time.
  • Focused Whole Class: The student remained focused the entire class but did not necessarily receive adequate credit during class itself.
  • Following Instructions: The student has complied with little to no argument.
  • Good Decision:
  • Good thinking: The student has made a comment (written or spoken) that shows a level of deep thinking.
  • Helping Others: The student has done something to help another student such as explaining an exercise, helping pack up, or something similar. Additionally, the student might have helped the teacher without being asked
  • Honesty: The student honestly admits to a negative behavior.
  • Ignoring disruptions: The student ignores things going on around her (talking, laughing, playing, arguing, etc.) and stays focused.
  • Leadership: The student leads other students. This could include:
    • encouraging them to get on task,
    • organizing a group’s efforts,
    • leading students in reorganizing the room.
  • Manners: The student shows good manners with other students and/or the teacher — the basics like
    • please
    • thank you
    • excuse me
    • you’re welcome
  • Materials: The student has her materials. (Receiving this might be a hint that the student hasn’t yet begun her starter.)
  • On task: The student is on task. The student might not necessarily be working hard, but at least the student is not being a disruption to others.
  • Participating: The student participates in a group discussion.
  • Patience: The student shows patience, especially when told to wait for something.
  • Persistence: The student doesn’t give up on a difficult task.
  • Pride: The student shows pride in her own work.
  • Self-control: The student clearly wants to speak out of turn, laugh loudly, or some other similarly disruptive action and refrains from doing so.
  • Taking initiative: The student doesn’t wait to be told to do something but instead does it from her own motivation.
  • Teamwork: A group of students works together well.
  • Transition Quickly: The student moves from one activity to another quickly and efficiently.
  • Working Hard: The student is engaged and focused, clearly working hard.
Negative Behaviors

  • Arguing with teacher: The student is called down for some behavior — talking out of turn, being disruptive, etc. — and the student argues about it. Examples include,
    • “I’m not the only one talking.”
    • “You see those other people talking?”
    • “I didn’t even do it!”
  • Disrespect: The student has shown disrespect either to an adult or to another student. It includes but is not limited to:
    • talking back
    • arguing
    • calling names
    • making rude comments
    • eye rolling
    • teeth sucking
    • disrespectful body language
  • Disruptive behavior: The student has been an interruption to class through movement or noise.
  • Disruptive laughter: The student has burst out laughing in a way that calls attention to the student’s laughter and implicitly invites others to join.
  • Dress code: The student enters the classroom with a dress code violation.
  • Ear buds: The student has her ear buds or other listening devices in her ears (or one ear) at an unsanctioned time.
  • Head down: The student has put his/her head down during a time when he/she should be working.
  • Lying: The student deliberately misleads the teacher or another student.
  • Missing materials: The student lacks the basic required materials needed to complete work, or the student has lost materials or handouts from the teacher.
  • Misuse Chromebook: The student is on unauthorized web sites during instructional time.
  • Not following directions: The student has been instructed to do something and has chosen not to comply.
  • Off task: The student is not working, usually indicating staring off into space.
  • Out of seat: The student is out of her seat without permission.
  • Phone out: The student’s phone is out.
  • Starter lost: The student has lost her starter (usually the article of the week) and needs another copy.
  • Talking out of turn: The student is engaged in side conversations.
No Points

These behaviors are simply recorded for the sake of record keeping.

  • ROCK card: The teacher has signed the student’s ROCK card.
  • Removed from class: The student’s behavior has reached a sufficiently disruptive level that he/she needs to leave the classroom.
  • Silent lunch: The teacher as assigned silent lunch for the student.
  • Talking (indeterminate): The teacher believes a certain student is talking disruptively but has no directly observed it. This is usually when the teacher’s back is turned, and he is certain he recognizes the student’s voice.