Double-Entry Journal

A double entry journal is a two-column journal that has quotes from the text on the left and an individual’s responses on the right.

For this example, I will use the nursery rhyme, “The Queen of Hearts.”

The Queen of Hearts she made some tarts
all on a summer’s day;
The Knave of Hearts he stole the tarts
and took them clean away.
The King of Hearts called for the tarts
and beat the Knave full sore
The Knave of Hearts brought back the tarts
and vowed he’d steal no more.

Below is an example of how a double entry journal would work.

Double-Entry Journal Example
The Queen of Hearts she made some tarts Why would the queen make them? It seems her cook would make them.Perhaps she just likes to bake.
The Knave of Hearts he stole the tarts
 and took them clean away.
Where they that good? It indicates that the Queen of Hearts must ahve been a good baker, with a reputation as such, else why would anyone have stolen the tarts.And what is a knave anyway? It used to mean a low servant, but now knave means someone who is not trustworth. I wonder if this nursery rhyme helped create that reputation, or if knaves were often so tempted to steal from their rich masters that they habitually did it.
The King of Hearts called for the tarts
and beat the Knave full sore
Again, why would the king do something that he most likely has servants to do? Perhaps he’s especially sadistic and he enjoys doing the beating himself.And why is he so upset over tarts? Someone could easily make them again. It does, however, indicate that the queen could indeed cook: everyone seems to be going crazy over her tarts.
The Knave of Hearts brought back the tarts
and vowed he’d steal no more.
Wouldn’t the knave simply be executed for stealing? After all, he’s just a low servant. It’s not like he’s an advisor or anything.Maybe he’s related to someone, or maybe there’s a history we don’t know about.
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